FORAMENRehab®
Cognitive Rehabilitation Software

Neuropsychological rehabilitation should address many facets of a brain injured individual, treat him or her in a holistic frame of reference with appropriate techniques and strategies for cognitive, emotional, and societal skills while increasing awareness and understanding of the new self (Pritagno2000). The continuous challenge to neuropsychology is to develop new methods for assessment and rehabilitation, and the critical evaluation of these methods. To quote George Prigatano (Prigatano2000) “... new techniques for the remediation of disturbed higher cerebral functioning should constantly be under development, while still attending to patients’ personal experiences and helping them adjust to their neuropsychological deficits in the context of interpersonal situations.”

Cognitive rehabilitation is traditionally considered an important part of rehabilitation of the brain injured patients. Cognitive rehabilitation is defined as a systematic, functionally oriented service of therapeutic activities that is based on assessment and understanding of the patient’s brain-behavioral deficits. Specific interventions may have various approaches, including practicing and re-establishing the impaired functions; reinforcing the use of preserved functions; teaching cognitive compensatory strategies for impaired functions; establishing the use of external compensatory devices such as electronic memory aids; enabling persons to adapt to their cognitive disability by fostering insight and understanding into their cognitive strengths and weaknesses. Regardless of the form of intervention, the aim of cognitive rehabilitation is to improve the person’s functioning in their everyday lives. According to the recommendations of evidence-based studies, computer-based interventions that include active therapist involvement to foster insight into cognitive strengths and weaknesses, to develop compensatory strategies, and to facilitate the transfer of skills into real-life situations may be used as part of a multi-modal intervention for cognitive deficits (Cicerone2000, Cicerone2005).

FORAMENRehab -cognitive software is a tool for cognitive rehabilitation to be used as a part of a holistic neuropsychological rehabilitation approach. It is tailored for adults suffering from brain injuries. Due to the variability of the tasks the software can also be used with children with acquired or developmental disorders. The modules are based on the theories and models of cognitive functioning as well as on the studies of recovery.

FORAMENRehab software provides an easy to handle and efficient graphical user interface operating in Windows environment. The menu structure, toolbar and icons are illustrative and the help screens provide information, so the software is usable even without the help of the clinician. Each task application has a clear written instruction on the screen as well as a model animation. The parameters of each task application can be modified to adjust to a particular user. The results are presented both in numerical tables and graphs and can be printed. They can also be saved to file and compared with the previous results.

Responsible for the content of the software are clinical neuropsychologists, LicPsych Jaana Sarajuuri and PhD Sanna Koskinen who work at the Käpylä Rehabilitation Centre which is a nationwide center for the rehabilitation of neurological patients in Finland. Multimedia J&J Intressi Ltd is responsible for the technical part of the software. Our working group warmly thanks LicPsych Ritva Laaksonen at KL-institute, Helsinki, and PhD Hely Kalska at the Department of Psychology of Helsinki University for their precious comments and Art director Petri Väänänen at the Oy Kemiön Tehdas Kimito Fabrik Ab.

Modules of FORAMENRehab software:


Credits

The FORAMENRehab Workgroup wishes to thank for valuable help:

Bosnian version

Haris Memisevic, PhD, Center for education and rehabilitation "Mjedenica",
for translating and localizing the instructions of the task applications.

Mahira Memisevic
for reading and recording of the female voices of the software.

English (UK) version

Professor Lindsay Wilson, University of Stirling,
for translating and localizing the instructions of the task applications.

Dr Andrew Bateman, Oliver Zangwill Center,
for valuable comments about the theoretical framework of the program.

PhD student Sara Simblett
for reading and recording of the female voices of the software. She also gave us valuable help for the proof-reading of the texts of some of the task applications.

Timo Kaitaro, PhD, clinical neuropsychologist, Käpylä Rehabilitation Center,
for proof-reading the texts of the software.

Finland Swedish version

Martin Westman, lic.phil., neuropsychologist, Folkhälsan Syd/Meltola Rehab,
for translating and localizing the Finland-Swedish version of the software.

Swedish version

Marika Möller, Ph.D, clinical neuropsychologist, Landstinget Sörmland,
for translating and localizing the instructions of the task applications.

Anette Ankarcrona, clinical neuropsychologist, Landstinget Sörmland,
for localizing the instructions of the task applications and for reading some of the female voices.

Bodil Mattsson assistant nurse, Landstinget Sörmland,
for valuable help for the proof-reading of the texts of some of the task applications and for reading of the female voices of the software.

Monica Wallinder nurse, Landstinget Sörmland,
for reading of the female voices of the software.

Magnus Vikström, technical engineer,
for technical support with the recordings and for reading of the male voices of the software.


References:
 

Prigatano, G.P. (2000). 
A brief overview of four principles of neuropsychological rehabilitation.
In: International Handbook of Neuropsychological Rehabilitation.
New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers. p115-125.
 
Cicerone K.D. et al. (2000).
Evidence-based cognitive rehabilitation: recommendations for clinical practice.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 81. p1596-1615.
 
Cicerone K.D. et al. (2005).
Evidence-based cognitive rehabilitation: Updated review of the literature from 1998 through 2002.
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 86. p1681–1692.